Tag: causes

Alzheimer’s Dementia Disease

Alzheimer’s Dementia Disease

What is Alzheimer’s Disease?

Alzheimer’s disease is an irreversible, progressive brain disorder that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills, and eventually the ability to carry out the simplest tasks. In most peoples with Alzheimer’s, symptoms first appear in their mid-60s.

A bit of history:

Alzheimer’s disease is named after Dr. Alois Alzheimer. In 1906, Dr. Alzheimer noticed changes in the brain tissue of a woman who had died of an unusual mental illness. Her symptoms included memory loss, language problems, and unpredictable behavior. After she died, he examined her brain and found many abnormal clumps (now called amyloid plaques) and tangled bundles of fibers (now called neurofibrillary, or tau, tangles).

These plaques and tangles in the brain are still considered some of the main features of Alzheimer’s disease. Another feature is the loss of connections between nerve cells (neurons) in the brain. Neurons transmit messages between different parts of the brain, and from the brain to muscles and organs in the body.

According to the Mayo Clinic:

Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive disorder that causes brain cells to waste away (degenerate) and die. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia — a continuous decline in thinking, behavioral and social skills that disrupts a person’s ability to function independently.

Alzheimers Disease

The early signs of the disease may be forgetting recent events or conversations. As the disease progresses, a person with Alzheimer’s disease will develop severe memory impairment and loose the ability to carry out everyday tasks.

Current Alzheimer’s disease medications may temporarily improve symptoms or slow the rate of decline. These treatments can sometimes help peoples with Alzheimer’s disease maximize function and maintain independence for a time. Different programs and services can help support peoples with Alzheimer’s disease and their caregivers.

There is no treatment that cures Alzheimer’s disease or alters the disease process in the brain. In advanced stages of the disease, complications from severe loss of brain function — such as dehydration, malnutrition or infection — result in death.

In 2013, 6.8 million people in the U.S. had been diagnosed with dementia. Of these, 5 million had a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s. By 2050, the numbers are expected to double.

Alzheimer’s disease is currently ranked as the sixth leading cause of death in the United States, but recent estimates indicate that the disorder may rank third, just behind heart disease and cancer, as a cause of death for older people.

Signs and Symptoms

Memory problems are typically one of the first signs of cognitive impairment related to Alzheimer’s disease. Some peoples with memory problems have a condition called mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In MCI, people have more memory problems than normal for their age, but their symptoms do not interfere with their everyday lives. Movement difficulties and problems with the sense of smell have also been linked to MCI. Older peoples with MCI are at greater risk for developing Alzheimer’s, but not all of them do. Some may even go back to normal cognition.

The first symptoms of Alzheimer’s vary from person to person. For many, decline in non-memory aspects of cognition, such as word-finding, vision/spatial issues, and impaired reasoning or judgment, may signal the very early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers are studying bio markers (biological signs of disease found in brain images, cerebrospinal fluid, and blood) to detect early changes in the brains of peoples with MCI and in cognitively normal people who may be at greater risk for Alzheimer’s. Studies indicate that such early detection is possible, but more research is needed before these techniques can be used routinely to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease in everyday medical practice.

What Causes Alzheimer’s Disease:

Scientists don’t yet fully understand what causes Alzheimer’s disease in most people. In peoples with early-onset Alzheimer’s, a genetic mutation may be the cause. Late-onset Alzheimer’s arises from a complex series of brain changes that occur over decades. The causes probably include a combination of genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors. The importance of any one of these factors in increasing or decreasing the risk of developing Alzheimer’s may differ from person to person.

Scientists believe that for most people, Alzheimer’s disease is caused by a combination of genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors that affect the brain over time.

Less than 1 percent of the time, Alzheimer’s is caused by specific genetic changes that virtually guarantee a person will develop the disease. These rare occurrences usually result in disease onset in middle age.

The exact causes of Alzheimer’s disease aren’t fully understood, but at its core are problems with brain proteins that fail to function normally, disrupt the work of brain cells (neurons) and unleash a series of toxic events. Neurons are damaged, loose connections to each other and eventually die.

The damage most often starts in the region of the brain that controls memory, but the process begins years before the first symptoms. The loss of neurons spreads in a somewhat predictable pattern to other regions of the brains. By the late stage of the disease, the brain has shrunk significantly.

Alzheimer s disease is a progressive disease.

The first symptoms of Alzheimer’s vary from person to person. For many, decline in non-memory aspects of cognition, such as word-finding, vision/spatial issues, and impaired reasoning or judgment, may signal the very early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers are studying bio markers (biological signs of disease found in brain images, cerebrospinal fluid, and blood) to detect early changes in the brains of peoples with MCI and in cognitively normal people who may be at greater risk for Alzheimer’s. Studies indicate that such early detection is possible, but more research is needed before these techniques can be used routinely to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease in everyday medical practice.

Mild Alzheimer’s Disease:

As Alzheimer’s disease progresses, people experience greater memory loss and other cognitive difficulties. Problems can include wandering and getting lost, trouble handling money and paying bills, repeating questions, taking longer to complete normal daily tasks, and personality and behavior changes. People are often diagnosed in this stage.

Moderate Alzheimer’s Disease:

In this stage, damage occurs in areas of the brain that control language, reasoning, sensory processing, and conscious thought. Memory loss and confusion grow worse, and people begin to have problems recognizing family and friends. They may be unable to learn new things, carry out multi step tasks such as getting dressed, or cope with new situations. In addition, people at this stage may have hallucinations, delusions, and paranoia and may behave impulsively.

Severe Alzheimer’s Disease:

Ultimately, plaques and tangles spread throughout the brain, and brain tissue shrinks significantly. People with severe Alzheimer’s cannot communicate and are completely dependent on others for their care. Near the end, the person may be in bed most or all of the time as the body shuts down.

How Alzheimer s Disease changes the brain. (Please click on the link below for the video)

https://youtu.be/0GXv3mHs9AU

Health, Environmental, and Lifestyle Factors:

Research suggests that a host of factors beyond genetics may play a role in the development and course of Alzheimer’s disease. There is a great deal of interest, for example, in the relationship between cognitive decline and vascular conditions such as heart disease, stroke, and high blood pressure, as well as metabolic conditions such as diabetes and obesity. Ongoing research will help us understand whether and how reducing risk factors for these conditions may also reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s.

A nutritious diet, physical activity, social engagement, and mentally stimulating pursuits have all been associated with helping people stay healthy as they age. These factors might also help reduce the risk of cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease. Clinical trials are testing some of these possibilities.

Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease:

To diagnose Alzheimer’s, doctors may:

  • Ask the person and a family member or friend questions about overall health, use of prescription and over-the-counter medicines, diet, past medical problems, ability to carry out daily activities, and changes in behavior and personality
  • Conduct tests of memory, problem solving, attention, counting, and language
  • Carry out standard medical tests, such as blood and urine tests, to identify other possible causes of the problem
  • Perform brain scans, such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or positron emission tomography (PET), to rule out other possible causes for symptoms

These tests may be repeated to give doctors information about how the person’s memory and other cognitive functions are changing over time.

Alzheimer’s disease can be definitely diagnosed only after death, by linking clinical measures with an examination of brain tissue in an autopsy.

People with memory and thinking concerns should talk to their doctor to find out whether their symptoms are due to Alzheimer’s or another cause, such as stroke, tumor, Parkinson’s disease, sleep disturbances, side effects of medication, an infection, or a non-Alzheimer’s dementia. Some of these conditions may be treatable and possibly reversible.

If the diagnosis is Alzheimer’s, beginning treatment early in the disease process may help preserve daily functioning for some time, even though the underlying disease process cannot be stopped or reversed. An early diagnosis also helps families plan for the future. They can take care of financial and legal matters, address potential safety issues, learn about living arrangements, and develop support networks.

In addition, an early diagnosis gives people greater opportunities to participate in clinical trials that are testing possible new treatments for Alzheimer’s disease or other research studies.

Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease:

Alzheimer’s disease is complex, and it is unlikely that any one drug or other intervention can successfully treat it. Current approaches focus on helping people maintain mental function, manage behavioral symptoms, and slow down certain problems, such as memory loss. Researchers hope to develop therapies targeting specific genetic, molecular, and cellular mechanisms so that the actual underlying cause of the disease can be stopped or prevented.

There are some prescription medications that your Doctor may advise you to take.

These drugs work by regulating neurotransmitters, the chemicals that transmit messages between neurons. They may help reduce symptoms and help with certain behavioral problems. However, these drugs don’t change the underlying disease process. They are effective for some but not all people, and may help only for a limited time.

I know I have mentioned this before, but I feel it necessary to mention it once again:

A nutritious diet, physical activity, social engagement, and mentally stimulating pursuits have all been associated with helping people stay healthy as they age. These factors might also help reduce the risk of cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease. Clinical trials are testing some of these possibilities.

You Tube Video on Alzheimer’s Disease. (Please click on the link below to watch)

https://youtu.be/yJXTXN4xrI8

It seems This article would not be complete without the mention of dementia.

Data show that more than 419,000 Canadians (65 years and older) are living with diagnosed dementia, almost two-thirds of whom are women. As this number does not include those underage 65 who may have a young onset diagnosis nor those that have not been diagnosed, the true picture of dementia in Canada may be somewhat larger. With a growing and aging population, this number of Canadians with dementia is expected to increase.

What is dementia?

Dementia is an overall term for a set of symptoms that are caused by disorders affecting the brain. Symptoms may include memory loss and difficulties with thinking, problem-solving or language, severe enough to reduce a person’s ability to perform everyday activities. A person with dementia may also experience changes in mood or behaviour.

Dementia is progressive, which means the symptoms will gradually get worse as more brain cells become damaged and eventually die.

Dementia is not a specific disease. Many diseases can cause dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia (due to strokes), Lewy Body disease, head trauma, fronto-temporal dementia, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease. These conditions can have similar and overlapping symptoms.

Some treatable conditions can produce symptoms similar to dementia, for example, vitamin deficiencies, thyroid disease, sleep disorders, or mental illness. It is therefore important to arrange for a full medical assessment as early as possible.

Getting a timely diagnosis can help you access information, resources and support through the Alzheimer Society, benefit from treatment, and plan ahead.

You Tube video on Dementia and the Similarities to Alzheimer s.

https://youtu.be/t–mkzfHuIE

What Causes Dementia?

The most common causes of dementia include:

More Causes:

Dementia is caused by damage to or loss of nerve cells and their connections in the brain. Depending on the area of the brain that’s affected by the damage, dementia can affect people differently and cause different symptoms.

Dementias are often grouped by what they have in common, such as the protein or proteins deposited in the brain or the part of the brain that’s affected. Some diseases look like dementias, such as those caused by a reaction to medications or vitamin deficiencies, and they might improve with treatment.

Dementia-like conditions that can be reversed:

Some causes of dementia or dementia-like symptoms can be reversed with treatment. They include:

  • Infections and immune disorders. Dementia-like symptoms can result from fever or other side effects of your body’s attempt to fight off an infection. Multiple sclerosis and other conditions caused by the body’s immune system attacking nerve cells also can cause dementia.
  • Metabolic problems and endocrine abnormalities. People with thyroid problems, low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), too little or too much sodium or calcium, or problems absorbing vitamin B-12 can develop dementia-like symptoms or other personality changes.
  • Nutritional deficiencies. Not drinking enough liquids (dehydration); not getting enough thiamine (vitamin B-1), which is common in peoples with chronic alcoholism; and not getting enough vitamins B-6 and B-12 in your diet can cause dementia-like symptoms. Copper and vitamin E deficiencies also can cause dementia symptoms.
  • Medication side effects. Side effects of medications, a reaction to a medication or an interaction of several medications can cause dementia-like symptoms.
  • Subdural hematomas. Bleeding between the surface of the brain and the covering over the brain, which is common in the elderly after a fall, can cause symptoms similar to those of dementia.
  • Poisoning. Exposure to heavy metals, such as lead, and other poisons, such as pesticides, as well as recreational drug or heavy alcohol use can lead to symptoms of dementia. Symptoms might resolve with treatment.
  • Brain tumors. Rarely, dementia can result from damage caused by a brain tumor.
  • Anoxia. This condition, also called hypoxia, occurs when organ tissues aren’t getting enough oxygen. Anoxia can occur due to severe sleep apneas, asthma, heart attack, carbon monoxide poisoning or other causes.
  • Normal-pressure hydrocephalus. This condition, which is caused by enlarged ventricles in the brain, can cause walking problems, urinary difficulty and memory loss.

Diagnosis:

Diagnosing dementia and its type can be challenging. People have dementia when they have cognitive impairment and loose their ability to perform daily functions, such as taking their medication, paying bills and driving safely.

To diagnose the cause of the dementia, the doctor must recognize the pattern of the loss of skills and function and determine what a person is still able to do. More recently, bio markers have become available to make a more accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease.

Your doctor will review your medical history and symptoms and conduct a physical examination. He or she will likely ask someone close to you about your symptoms as well.

No single test can diagnose dementia, so doctors are likely to run a number of tests that can help pinpoint the problem.

Dementia Disease

Lewy Body Dementia:

Many Americans first heard about Lewy Body Dementia (LBD) after it was revealed that comedy legend Robin Williams suffered from the disease at the time of his death. Considered by some experts to be the second most common form of dementia, LBD affects an estimated 1.4 million Americans. In this type of dementia, Lewy bodies–or abnormal deposits of a protein known as alpha-synuclein–are present in the brain, impeding normal cognitive function.

Many peoples with LBD are initially misdiagnosed, because they may experience symptoms that are common in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. People with LBD experience reduced attention and alertness, which may mimic the memory problems of someone with Alzheimer’s. However, memory is fairly intact in peoples with LBD, although their problem-solving skills tend to be highly impaired.

Hallucinations are also common in the early stage of the disorder (unlike in Alzheimer’s, where this symptom occurs in the later stages). Like peoples with Parkinson’s disease, those with Lewy body dementia may have mobility problems–slow, stiff or shaky movements, trouble balancing and a shuffling walk.

It’s also common for peoples with LBD to have one or more sleep disorders, including REM sleep disorder behavior (RBD), in which they physically act out their dreams. RBD, which can begin years or even decades before Lewy body dementia appears, can cause injuries to those living with the condition and to their sleeping partner.

Vascular Dementia:

The Alzheimer’s Association considers vascular dementia to be the second most common form of dementia. (Statistics vary widely, but it’s estimated that it affects one to four percent of people over 65.) This disorder, which often begins abruptly, is caused by poor blood flow to the brain, resulting from any number of conditions that narrow the blood vessels, including stroke, diabetes and high blood pressure.

Usually the culprit is multiple small strokes (infarcts) caused by blood clots or thickened or ruptured small arteries that connect to the center of the brain. (This is called multi-infarct dementia.) The type of dementia may also be caused by one big stroke (which would be referred to as post-stroke dementia).

Symptoms of vascular dementia include confusion, disorientation and trouble following directions. Recall of day-to-day events (episodic memory) becomes impaired, but recognition–of people, for example–doesn’t. Vascular dementia loss may progress to hallucinations, agitation, or withdrawal and symptoms may clearly worsen after each successive stroke.

Frontotemporal Dementia:

FTD, which usually occurs between ages 40 to 45, affects personality significantly, usually resulting in a decline in empathy, as well as social skills. People with this disorder may exhibit increasingly inappropriate actions and repetitive compulsive behavior, including consumption of inedible objects. Frontotemporal dementia is also associated with impaired judgment, mood swings and apathy. Some sub types of FTD are marked by decline in speech while even rarer sub types feature mobility problems like those seen in Parkinson’s.

Did you know that nearly six out of 10 older Americans with dementia are undiagnosed or unaware of their diagnosis, and many others are misdiagnosed? It can be a mistake to assume that cognitive issues are caused by Alzheimer’s. If the decline is caused by another condition, treatments used for Alzheimer’s might be ineffective or even harmful.

People with Lewy body dementia, for example, are often highly sensitive to the anti psychotics sometimes used to treat behavioral symptoms in peoples with Alzheimer’s. Also, keep in mind that that dementia-like symptoms are sometimes caused by conditions like nutritional deficiencies and infections that can be reversed if the underlying cause is treated. (Alzheimer’s disease and many other dementias including LBD are incurable.)

Early and accurate diagnosis of dementia is critical to effectively managing it. If your loved one’s doctor is not familiar with the complexities of a dementia diagnosis, ask for a referral to a neurologist, especially one specializing in dementia, who will test your loved one’s memory, thinking abilities and movement. Also consider a referral to a geriatrician, a doctor with specialized training in treating older adults.

Diagnosing dementia requires a physical exam and blood tests, plus a full review the patient’s health care, family history and medication history. Doctors will talk to you and other family members about symptoms and behaviors you have witnessed and will evaluate your loved one for a host of conditions, including:

Mixed dementia:

Autopsy studies of the brains of people 80 and older who had dementia indicate that many had a combination of several causes, such as Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia and Lewy body dementia. Studies are ongoing to determine how having mixed dementia affects symptoms and treatments.

Prevention:

There’s no sure way to prevent dementia, but there are steps you can take that might help. More research is needed, but it might be beneficial to do the following:

  • Keep your mind active. Mentally stimulating activities, such as reading, solving puzzles and playing word games, and memory training might delay the onset of dementia and decrease its effects.
  • Be physically and socially active. Physical activity and social interaction might delay the onset of dementia and reduce its symptoms. Move more and aim for 150 minutes of exercise a week.
  • Quit smoking. Some studies have shown that smoking in middle age and beyond may increase your risk of dementia and blood vessel (vascular) conditions. Quitting smoking might reduce your risk and will improve your health.
  • Get enough vitamins. Some research suggests that peoples with low levels of vitamin D in their blood are more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. You can get vitamin D through certain foods, supplements and sun exposure.More study is needed before an increase in vitamin D intake is recommended for preventing dementia, but it’s a good idea to make sure you get adequate vitamin D. Taking a daily B-complex vitamin and vitamin C may also be helpful.
  • Manage cardiovascular risk factors. Treat high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, and high body mass index (BMI). High blood pressure might lead to a higher risk of some types of dementia. More research is needed to determine whether treating high blood pressure may reduce the risk of dementia.
  • Treat health conditions. See your doctor for treatment if you experience hearing loss, depression or anxiety.
  • Maintain a healthy diet. Eating a healthy diet is important for many reasons, but a diet such as the Mediterranean diet — rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and omega-3 fatty acids, which are commonly found in certain fish and nuts — might promote health and lower your risk of developing dementia. This type of diet also improves cardiovascular health, which may help lower dementia risk. Try eating fatty fish such as salmon three times a week, and a handful of nuts — especially almonds and walnuts — daily.
  • Get quality sleep. Practice good sleep hygiene, and talk to your doctor if you snore loudly or have periods where you stop breathing or gasp during sleep.

In most cases where disease occurs, if not genetic: Your diet (nutrition), exercise, both physical and mental, sunshine, proper sleep. These are all things you can control. Smoking and excessive drinking are things to keep in mind to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

I recently saw a documentary by Dr. David Suziki that you may find interesting, below are the links.

https://www.cbc.ca/natureofthings/episodes/untangling-alzheimers

https://www.pinterest.ca/pin/548172585866967622/

Thank you for reading,

Michael.

Comments are welcome.

Alcohol Addiction Facts

Alcohol Addiction Facts

       Alcoholism the sometimes misunderstood disease.

Definition of alcoholism:

In a medical context, alcoholism is said to exist when two or more of the following conditions are present: a person drinks large amounts of alcohol over a long time period, has difficulty cutting down, acquiring and drinking alcohol takes up a great deal of time, alcohol is strongly desired, usage results in not fulfilling responsibilities, usage results in social problems, usage results in health problems, usage results in risky situations, withdrawal occurs when stopping, and alcohol tolerance has occurred with use.

Why can someone drink alcohol on a social level and with a level of responsibility. While someone else has to drink to get drunk, and sometimes lose that feeling of responsibility to a point of slurred speech and perhaps even stagger and finally pass out.

What is the difference between these two people?

For the longest time alcoholism was regarded as a conscious choice one makes to get drunk. Yes, sometimes there is the person who drinks for the sole idea of getting drunk, perhaps a social occasion, help them overcome a traumatic event or just because everyone else is drunk.

The hangover, the realization of knowing this was just a brief encounter and now it is time to get back to doing the things you need to do to become that responsible person again. In most cases this is accepted behaviour and laughed about after. The is the social drinker widely accepted by everyone.

Unfortunately this is not the case for everyone. There are those who have that one drink, then two and proceed to a level of total intoxication.

Casual drinking, alcohol abuse, & alcoholism:

Let’s start with casual drinking. Unless you have religious or personal restrictions, there’s nothing wrong with a few drinks with friends, maybe some wine with dinner, or the occasional bubbly at a party. The problem starts, though, when you begin abusing the substance.

Many people use the terms “alcohol abuse” and “alcoholism” interchangeably. However, alcoholism refers to an alcohol addiction or dependence, where the individual has a physical or psychological compulsion to drink alcohol. Alcohol abuse refers to a pattern of behavior where a person drinks excessively in spite of the negative consequences.

Ten Warning Signs You’re An Alcoholic:

The following are ten warning signs of alcoholism that might help answer the question “Am I an Alcoholic?”:

  • Drinking alone and in secrecy
  • Losing interest in other activities that were once enjoyable
  • Alcohol cravings
  • Making drinking a priority over responsibilities, such as employment and family
  • Alcohol withdrawal symptoms (sweating, anxiety, etc.)
  • Extreme mood swings and irritability
  • Feelings of guilt associated with drinking
  • Having a drink first thing in the morning
  • Continuing to drink, despite health, financial and family problems
  • Inability to stop or control the amount of alcohol that’s consumed

Symptoms of alcoholism and alcohol addiction:

Alcoholism is the physical and/or mental dependence on alcohol.

If you find yourself regularly thinking about your next drink, or if you’ve tried to cut back on drinking and never quite succeeded, you may have an alcohol addiction.

Alcoholism begins with tolerance. Alcohol is a drug, and as you drink more, the body becomes less susceptible to its effects. And with enough repetition, it comes to expect the presence of alcohol. This leads to alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS), when the body reacts to a heavy drinker stopping the supply.

Symptoms of alcohol withdrawal:

According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal include:

  • Anxiety or nervousness
  • Depression
  • Fatigue
  • Irritability
  • Jumpiness or shakiness
  • Mood swings
  • Nightmares
  • Not thinking clearly

It may take a few hours or days for these symptoms to show, and they may get worse in the days following.

Withdrawal can be dangerous, but a detox program can help you move past the negative symptoms safely.

In some cases, the individual may experience the most severe form of alcohol withdrawal called delirium tremens. The can cause agitation, fever, hallucinations, confusion, and seizures. For this reason, heavy drinkers who are looking to end their addiction should seek medical assistance.

In the past, a person with this condition was referred to as an “alcoholic.” However, this is increasingly seen as an unhelpful and negative label. Health professionals now say that a person has an alcohol use disorder (AUD).

According to the National Institute of Health (NIH), in 2015, 15.1 million American adults (6.2 percent of the population) had an alcohol use problem.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), globally, 3.3 million deaths every year result from the harmful use of alcohol.

Causes:

Young person drinking alcohol in park.
Causes and risk factors include peer pressure, drinking from a young age, and depression.

Alcohol dependence can take from a few years to several decades to develop. For some people who are particularly vulnerable, it can happen within months.

Over time, regular alcohol consumption can disrupt the balance of:

  • gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain
  • glutamate

GABA controls impulsiveness and glutamate stimulates the nervous system.

Dopamine levels in the brain rise after consuming alcohol. Dopamine levels may make the drinking experience more gratifying.

Over the long- or medium-term, excessive drinking can significantly alter the levels of these brain chemicals. The causes the body to crave alcohol in order to feel good and avoid feeling bad.

Possible risk factors:

Some risk factors may also be linked to excessive drinking.

  • Genes: Some specific genetic factors may make some people more likely to develop an addiction to alcohol and other substances. There may be a family history.
  • The age of the first alcoholic drink: A study has suggested that people who start drinking alcohol before the age of 15 years may be more likely to have problems with alcohol later in life.
  • Easy access: There appears to be a correlation between easy access to alcohol — such as cheap prices — and alcohol abuse and alcohol-related deaths. One study registered a significant drop in alcohol-related deaths after one state raised alcohol taxes. The effect was found to be nearly two to four times that of other prevention strategies, such as school programs or media campaigns.
  • Stress: Some stress hormones are linked to alcohol abuse. If stress and anxiety levels are high, a person may consume alcohol in an attempt to blank out the upheaval.
  • Peer drinking: People whose friends drink regularly or excessively are more likely to drink too much. The can eventually lead to alcohol-related problems.
  • Low self-esteem: Those with low self-esteem who have alcohol readily available are more likely to consume too much.
  • Depression: People with depression may deliberately or unwittingly use alcohol as a means of self-treatment. On the other hand, consuming too much alcohol may increase the risk of depression, rather than reducing it.
  • Media and advertising: In some countries, alcohol is portrayed as a glamorous, worldly, and cool activity. Alcohol advertising and media coverage of it may increase the risk by conveying the message that excessive drinking is acceptable.
  • How the body processes (metabolizes) alcohol: People who need comparatively more alcohol to achieve an effect have a higher risk of eventually developing health problems related to alcohol.

More Risk Factors:

This information I know I have repeated it, there is a reason. Too many people are dying, too many families are suffering from watching a loved one on his or her journey to an early death. The mood changes, sad, happy depressed and yes suicidal. I will repeat myself, my words may be redundant but I am an alcoholic, and I do not want to go back to being sick again. Yes I will repeat, I am scared.

Alcohol use may begin in the teens, but alcohol use disorder occurs more frequently in the 20s and 30s, though it can start at any age.

  • Steady drinking over time. Drinking too much on a regular basis for an extended period or binge drinking on a regular basis can lead to alcohol-related problems or alcohol use disorder.
  • Starting at an early age. People who begin drinking — especially binge drinking — at an early age are at a higher risk of alcohol use disorder.
  • Family history. The risk of alcohol use disorder is higher for people who have a parent or other close relative who has problems with alcohol. This may be influenced by genetic factors.
  • Depression and other mental health problems. It’s common for people with a mental health disorder such as anxiety, depression, schizophrenia or bipolar disorder to have problems with alcohol or other substances.
  • History of trauma. People with a history of emotional or other trauma are at increased risk of alcohol use disorder.
  • Having bariatric surgery. Some research studies indicate that having bariatric surgery may increase the risk of developing alcohol use disorder or of relapsing after recovering from alcohol use disorder.
  • Social and cultural factors. Having friends or a close partner who drinks regularly could increase your risk of alcohol use disorder. The glamorous way that drinking is sometimes portrayed in the media also may send the message that it’s OK to drink too much. For young people, the influence of parents, peers and other role models can impact risk.

Diagnosis:

For AUD to be diagnosed in the U.S., the individual must meet the criteria laid out in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), published by the American Psychiatric Association (APS).

The criteria include having a pattern of consumption that leads to considerable impairment or distress.

At least three of the following criteria should have been present during the past 12 months:

  • Alcohol tolerance: A person needs a large quantity of alcohol to feel intoxicated. However, when the liver is damaged and cannot metabolize the alcohol so well, this tolerance may drop. Damage to the central nervous system may also reduce tolerance levels.
  • Withdrawal symptoms: When the individual abstains from alcohol or cuts down, they experience tremors, insomnia, nausea, or anxiety. They may drink more to avoid these symptoms.
  • Beyond intentions: The person drinks more alcohol, or over a longer period, than they intended.
  • Unsuccessful attempts to cut down: The person is continuously trying to cut down alcohol consumption but does not succeed. They may have a persistent desire to cut down.
  • Time consumed: The person spends a lot of time obtaining, using, or recovering from alcohol consumption.
  • Withdrawal: The individual withdraws from recreational, social, or occupational activities that they previously participated in.
  • Persistence: The person continues consuming alcohol, even though they know it is harming them physically and psychologically.

Some signs and symptoms of alcohol abuse may be due to another condition. Ageing can lead to memory problems and falls, for example.

A person may go to the doctor about a medical condition, such as a digestive problem, and not mention how much alcohol they consume. The can make it difficult for a doctor to identify who might benefit from alcohol dependency screening.

If a health worker suspect alcohol may be a problem, they may ask a series of questions. If the patient answers in a certain way, the doctor may then use a standardized questionnaire to find out more.

Complications:

Sad woman covering face with hands.

Complications of this condition may include memory loss, confusion, mental health issues, and problems with work or home life.

Drinking alcohol usually elevates a person’s mood at first.

However, a person who has been consuming unhealthy amounts of alcohol for a long time is likely to become sedated when they drink.

This is because alcohol depresses the nervous system.

Alcohol may undermine a person’s judgment. It can lower inhibitions and alter the drinker’s thoughts, emotions, and general behavior.

Heavy regular drinking can seriously affect a person’s ability to coordinate their muscles and speak properly.

Heavy binge drinking could lead to a coma.

Eventually, regular heavy drinking may cause at least one of the following problems:

  • Fatigue: The person feels tired most of the time.
  • Memory loss: Alcohol affects the short-term memory in particular.
  • Eye muscles: The eye muscles can become significantly weaker.
  • Liver diseases: There is a higher chance of developing hepatitis and cirrhosis, an irreversible and progressive condition.
  • Gastrointestinal complications: Gastritis or pancreas damage can occur. These will undermine the body’s ability to digest food, absorb certain vitamins, and produce hormones that regulate metabolism.
  • Hypertension: Regular heavy drinking is likely to raise blood pressure.
  • Heart problems: There is a higher risk of cardiomyopathy (damaged heart muscle), heart failure, and stroke.
  • Diabetes: There is a high risk of developing diabetes type 2, and people with diabetes have a high chance of complications if they regularly consume more alcohol than is recommended. Alcohol prevents the release of glucose from the liver, resulting in hypoglycemia. If a person with diabetes is already using insulin to lower their blood sugar levels, hypoglycemia could have serious consequences.
  • Menstruation: Excessive consumption of alcohol can stop or disrupt menstruation.
  • Erectile dysfunction: There may be problems getting or sustaining an erection.
  • Fetal alcohol syndrome: Consuming alcohol during pregnancy increases the risk of birth defects. The newborn may have a small head, heart problems, shortened eyelids, and developmental and cognitive problems.
  • Thinning bones: Alcohol interferes with the production of new bone, leading to a thinning of the bones and an increased risk of fractures.
  • Nervous system problems: There may be numbness in the extremities, dementia, and confused or disordered thinking.
  • Cancer: There is a higher risk of developing several cancers, including cancer of the mouth, esophagus, liver, colon, rectum, breast, prostate, and pharynx.
  • Accidents: There is a higher chance of injuries from falls, road traffic accidents, and so on.
  • Domestic abuse: Alcohol is a major factor in spouse-beating, child abuse, and conflicts with neighbors.
  • Work or school problems: Employment or educational problems and unemployment are often alcohol-related.
  • Suicide: Suicide rates among people with alcohol dependence or who consume alcohol inappropriately are higher than among those who do not.
  • Mental illness: Alcohol abuse increases the risk of mental illness, and it can make existing mental illnesses worse.
  • Problems with the law: People who consume alcohol are significantly more likely to spend time in court or in prison, compared with the rest of the population.

Later on I will be talking about treatment. Personally I do not think there is anything that that can be considered treatment to the elimination of alcoholism. I as an alcoholic know that if I pick up any addictive substance, I will end up going back to drinking alcohol. I have to watch out for cough mixtures, Tylenol with codeine (Tylenol 3). There is no cure, only permanent and absolute abstinence. Yes, I am fearful I may pick up a trigger. I have to watch out what kind of social functions I attend.

What causes it?

The cause of alcohol use disorder is still unknown. Alcohol use disorder develops when you drink so much that chemical changes in the brain occur. These changes increase the pleasurable feelings you get when you drink alcohol. This makes you want to drink more often, even if it causes harm.

Eventually, the pleasurable feelings associated with alcohol use go away and the person with alcohol use disorder will engage in drinking to prevent withdrawal symptoms. These withdrawal symptoms can be quite unpleasant and even dangerous.

Alcohol use disorder typically develops gradually over time. It’s also known to run in families. It has not been proven but it is supposed to attack the male’s in the family try. Indications imply it may skip one generation. Within this said family it may skip all the females. This is not conclusive but it happens all too often to be dismissed.

How is it treated?

Treatment for alcohol use disorder varies, but each method is meant to help you stop drinking altogether. The is called abstinence. Treatment may occur in stages and can include the following:

  • detoxification or withdrawal to rid your body of alcohol
  • rehabilitation to learn new coping skills and behaviors
  • counseling to address emotional problems that may cause you to drink
  • support groups, including 12-step programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)
  • medical treatment for health problems associated with alcohol use disorder
  • medications to help control addiction

There are a couple of different medications that may help with alcohol use disorder:

  • Naltrexone (ReVia) is used only after someone has detoxed from alcohol. This type of drug works by blocking certain receptors in the brain that are associated with the alcoholic “high.” This drug, in combination with counseling, may help decrease a person’s craving for alcohol.
  • Acamprosate is a medication that can help re-establish the brain’s original chemical state before alcohol dependence. This drug should also be combined with therapy.
  • Disulfiram (Antabuse) is a drug that causes physical discomfort (such as nausea, vomiting, and headaches) any time the person consumes alcohol.

You may need to seek treatment at an inpatient facility if your addiction to alcohol is severe. These facilities will provide you with 24-hour care as you withdraw from alcohol and recover from your addiction. Once you’re well enough to leave, you’ll need to continue to receive treatment on an outpatient basis.

What’s the outlook for a person with alcohol use disorder?

Recovering from alcohol use disorder is difficult. Your outlook will depend on your ability to stop drinking. Many people who seek treatment are able to overcome the addiction. A strong support system is helpful for making a complete recovery.

Your outlook will also depend on the health complications that have developed as a result of your drinking. Alcohol use disorder can severely damage your liver. It can also lead to other health complications, including:

Alcoholism is a result of a combination of genetic, psychological, environmental and social factors. The more risk factors a person exhibits, the more likely they are to become an alcoholic. And sometimes those risk factors are entirely out of the person’s control. Let’s cover some of them below:

1. STRESSFUL ENVIRONMENTS

While not every person turns to alcohol to relieve stress, some people do. When a person has a stressful job, for example, they may be more likely to drink heavily. This is often the case with certain occupations such as doctors and nurses – their day-to-day lives can be extremely stressful. To lower this risk factor, take the time to de-stress with healthy methods, like reading a good book, exercising or taking a nap.

Eight percent of high school students have reported binge drinking alcohol to the point of vomiting. Twelve percent of students have reported participating in a drinking game with their peers.

2. DRINKING AT AN EARLY AGE

According to the Mayo Clinic, those who begin drinking at an early age are more likely to have an alcohol problem or a physical dependence on alcohol as they get older. Not only is this because drinking may become a comfortable habit, but also because the body’s tolerance levels may increase.

3. MENTAL HEALTH PROBLEMS LIKE DEPRESSION

Anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder or other mental health issues can increase risk of alcoholism. It’s easy to turn to alcohol when a person is feeling anxious or depressed – and the effects of alcohol may seem to temporarily ease those feelings. The can resort to drinking more and more, leading to alcohol addiction.

4. TAKING ALCOHOL WITH MEDICINE

Some medicines can increase the toxic effects of alcohol on the body. When a person continually takes alcohol with their medications, they may become addicted to the effects that follow – some of which have the capability to be very dangerous and even life-threatening.

5. FAMILY HISTORY

If you have a parent or other relative who is an alcoholic, your risk of alcoholism automatically increases. Part of this is due to genetics, but the other part has to do with your environment. Spending time around people who drink heavily or abuse alcohol can influence you to do the same.

Multiple factors can play a role in a person’s risk of alcoholism. While the above may not directly be considered “causes” of alcoholism, they can play a role in its development. It’s important to understand your risk and do what you can to lower it as much as possible.

  • More than 15 million people struggle with an alcohol use disorder in the United States, but less than eight percent of those receive treatment.
  • More than 65 million Americans report binge drinking in the past month, which is more than 40 percent of the total of current alcohol users.
  • Teen alcohol use kills 4,700 people each year. That’s more than all illegal drugs combined.
  • Drunk driving costs the United States more than $199 billion every year.

ALCOHOL AND WOMEN:

  • According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, more than 5.3 million women ages 18 and older have an alcohol use disorder.
  • Approximately one in two women of child-bearing age drink, and 18 percent of women in this group binge drink (five drinks per binge, on average).
  • Excessive drinking can interrupt the menstrual cycle and lead to infertility.
  • Women who binge drink are more likely to have unprotected sex, increasing the risk of unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases.
  • Women who drink while pregnant increase the risk of fetal alcohol syndrome, which can cause mental and physical birth defects.
  • Binge drinking dramatically increases the risk of sexual assault on women, especially those living in a college setting.
  • More than 45 percent of adult women report drinking alcohol in the last month, and 12 percent of these report binge drinking.
  • Alcohol abuse disorder in women has increased by 83.7% between 2002 and 2013, according to a 2017 study sponsored by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA).
  • High-risk drinking, defined as more than three drinks in a day or seven in a week for women, is on the rise among women by about 58%, according to a 2017 study comparing habits from 2001-2002 and 2012-2013.
  • Death from liver cirrhosis rose in women from 2000 to 2013.

Rapid increase in deaths due to alcohol-related liver disease:

The deaths linked to the end stages of liver damage jumped by 65 percent with alcohol a major cause, adults age 25-34 the biggest victims and fatalities highest among whites, American Indians and Hispanics.

Liver specialist Elliot B. Tapper, M.D., says he’s witnessed the disturbing shift in demographics among the patients with liver failure he treats at Michigan Medicine. National data collected by Tapper and study co-author Neehar Parikh, M.D., M.S., confirms that in communities across the country more young people are drinking themselves to death.

The data published in the journal BMJ shows adults age 25-34 experienced the highest average annual increase in cirrhosis deaths — about 10.5 percent each year. The rise was driven entirely by alcohol-related liver disease, the authors say.

Other Treatments for Alcohol Addiction:

Acupuncture for Alcohol Addiction:

Acupuncture (a needle-based therapy long used in traditional Chinese medicine) is often recommended to help reduce alcohol cravings, relieve withdrawal symptoms, and ease the anxiety and depression frequently experienced by alcoholics.

Indeed, a 2002 study of 34 alcoholics found that two weeks of acupuncture treatments (combined with carbamazepine, a drug sometimes used in managing alcohol withdrawal) helped decrease the participants’ withdrawal symptoms. However, a systematic review published in 2009 concluded that there is insufficient evidence to support acupuncture’s effectiveness in alcoholism treatment.

Milk thistle (Silybum marianum), an herb rich in the antioxidant silymarin, is often touted as a means of restoring liver health and protecting against alcohol-induced liver damage. While preliminary research indicates that milk thistle may offer some benefit to those looking to treat alcohol-related liver disease, more studies are needed to draw any definitive conclusions about the herb’s effectiveness in enhancing liver health.

In a 2003 study on laboratory rats, scientists discovered that feeding the animals extract of kudzu (Pueraria lobata) helped curb their alcohol dependence. What’s more, a small study published in 2005 showed that taking kudzu supplements helped reduce alcohol intake in humans.

Detoxing Herbs for the Liver & Blood:

Dandelion Root (Taraxacum offinale), Artichoke Leaf (Cynara scolymus) and Milk Thistle (Silybum marianum) are excellent herbs to cleanse and strengthen the liver when recovering from long-term alcohol use.
Burdock Root (Arctium lappa), Red Clover (Trifolium pratense) are blood cleansers that start the gentle process of cleasing toxins out of your blood and body.  Drink plenty of water to assist your body in the detoxification process.
Apple Cider Vinegar is another natural way to stimulate your liver, digestive system and alkalinise your body.  Mix 1-2 tsp of unpasteurised, organic ACV in 1 cup of water, drink before meals, 3 times daily for best results. If you are doing a detox this July, this is a great drink to include in your regime.
Herbs to Overcome Cravings:
Gymnema (Gymnema sylvestris) is an amazing herb to regulate blood sugar – many people are surprised how much of their alcohol habit is really a secret sugar addiction!

Kudzu (Peuraria lobata) is one of the oldest known herbal medicines, used in Traditional Chinese Medicine for reducing the craving for alcohol and as a hangover cure. A recent Harvard Medical School study corroborates this use.

More at Home Help:

If using natural methods to home-detox, take a dose of vitamin-B complex, plus a thiamine (vitamin B1) supplement and large doses of vitamin C, selenium, magnesium and zinc. A combination of amino acids or a large dose of L-glutamine will help combat cravings.

Milk thistle and alpha lipoic acid supplements can help the liver recover after prolonged alcohol abuse.

An over-the-counter sleep remedy such as melatonin or valerian can help with insomnia bought on by alcohol withdrawal.

Home Detox Steps:

Abruptly stopping drinking when you have withdrawal symptoms is not advisable without medication. For hundreds of years, long before medications were available, people have successfully used alcohol for alcohol withdrawal symptoms. The optimal drink to use is beer, as anything stronger will likely lead to drunkenness.

The idea is to drink small amounts of beer, tapering down gradually until all possibilities of suffering withdrawal symptoms have passed. Usually within 24 to 48 hours the patient is able to stop drinking the beer safely.

The amount of beer will depend on each individual. Generally, 12 ounces every hour is a reasonable starting point, then slowly reduce the amount of beer, or increase the amount of time between taking the beer. After three hours, you should be able to safely take only 8 ounces per hour, which can then be reduced to 4 ounces every two or three hours.

Combine the beer tapering with your vitamin supplements, and drink plenty of water. Lemon juice added to the water will also help your body detox.

Eat only light foods, such as fresh fruits or vegetables, and then only if you feel hungry. Do not force food because you feel you should be eating. Your body has enough to cope with eliminating the alcohol, and it will let you know when it feels ready for food. By eating before your body is ready, you are simply putting more of a burden on overworked organs.

Related stories: Please click on the titles for more information.

My name is Michael, and I am a recovering alcoholic.

Thank you for reading.

Comments are welcome.

Living With Arthritis Pain

Living With Arthritis Pain

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 54.4 million adults in the United States have received a diagnosis of some form of arthritis. Of these, 23.7 million people have their activity curtailed in some way by their condition.

What is arthritis?  

Arthritis is an inflammation of the joints. It can affect one joint or multiple joints. There are more than 100 different types of arthritis, with different causes and treatment methods. Two of the most common types are osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

The symptoms of arthritis usually develop over time, but they may also appear suddenly. Arthritis is most commonly seen in adults over the age of 65, but it can also develop in children, teens, and younger adults. Arthritis is more common in women than men and in people who are overweight.

What are the symptoms of arthritis?

Joint pain, stiffness, and swelling are the most common symptoms of arthritis. Your range of motion may also decrease, and you may experience redness of the skin around the joint. Many people with arthritis notice their symptoms are worse in the morning.

In the case of RA, you may feel tired or experience a loss of appetite due to the inflammation the immune system’s activity causes. You may also become anemic — meaning your red blood cell count decreases — or have a slight fever. Severe RA can cause joint deformity if left untreated.

What causes arthritis?

Cartilage is a firm but flexible connective tissue in your joints. It protects the joints by absorbing the pressure and shock created when you move and put stress on them. A reduction in the normal amount of this cartilage tissue cause some forms of arthritis.

Normal wear and tear causes OA, one of the most common forms of arthritis. An infection or injury to the joints can exacerbate this natural breakdown of cartilage tissue. Your risk of developing OA may be higher if you have a family history of the disease.

Another common form of arthritis, RA, is an autoimmune disorder. It occurs when your body’s immune system attacks the tissues of the body. These attacks affect the synovium, a soft tissue in your joints that produces a fluid that nourishes the cartilage and lubricates the joints.

RA is a disease of the synovium that will invade and destroy a joint. It can eventually lead to the destruction of both bone and cartilage inside the joint.

The exact cause of the immune system’s attacks is unknown. But scientists have discovered genetic markers that increase your risk of developing RA five fold.

How is arthritis diagnosed?

Seeing your primary care physician is a good first step if you’re unsure who to see for an arthritis diagnosis. They will perform a physical exam to check for fluid around the joints, warm or red joints, and limited range of motion in the joints. Your doctor can refer you to a specialist if needed.

If you’re experiencing severe symptoms, you may choose to schedule an appointment with a rheumatologist first. This may lead to a faster diagnosis and treatment.

Extracting and analyzing inflammation levels in your blood and joint fluids can help your doctor determine what kind of arthritis you have. Blood tests that check for specific types of antibodies like anti-CCP (anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide), RF (rheumatoid factor), and ANA (antinuclear antibody) are also common diagnostic tests.

Doctors commonly use imaging scans such as X-ray, MRI, and CT scans to produce an image of your bones and cartilage. This is so they can rule out other causes of your symptoms, such as bone spurs.

How is arthritis treated?

The main goal of treatment is to reduce the amount of pain you’re experiencing and prevent additional damage to the joints. You’ll learn what works best for you in terms of controlling pain. Some people find heating pads and ice packs to be soothing. Others use mobility assistance devices, like canes or walkers, to help take pressure off sore joints.

Improving your joint function is also important. Your doctor may prescribe you a combination of treatment methods to achieve the best results.

Shop heating pads for pain relief.

Medication.

Different types of medication treat arthritis:

Analgesics, such as hydrocodone (Vicodin) or acetaminophen (Tylenol), are effective for pain management, but don’t help decrease inflammation.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Advil) and salicylates, help control pain and inflammation. Salicylates can thin the blood, so they should be used very cautiously with additional blood thinning medications.

Menthol or capsaicin creams block the transmission of pain signals from your joints.

Immuno-suppressants like prednisone or cortisone help reduce inflammation.

Personal Note: Herbal remedies link

I am not an advocate of big pharmaceutical drugs. I am aware that in some cases that you may not have any other choices. I will always recommend you follow your Doctors instructions.

My articles mostly explore natural ways of healing, through herbal remedies, essential oils, diet, exercise and the list goes on. Further on in my article I will be discussing these alternatives.

Surgery:

Surgery to replace your joint with an artificial one may be an option. This form of surgery is most commonly performed to replace hips and knees.

If your arthritis is most severe in your fingers or wrists, your doctor may perform a joint fusion. In this procedure, the ends of your bones are locked together until they heal and become one.

Physical therapy:

Physical therapy involving exercises that help strengthen the muscles around the affected joint is a core component of arthritis treatment.

Diet, Exercise and Alternatives:

Weight loss and maintaining a healthy weight reduce the risk of developing OA and can reduce symptoms if you already have it.

Eating a healthy diet is important for weight loss. Choosing a diet with lots of antioxidants, such as fresh fruits, vegetables, and herbs, can help reduce inflammation. Other inflammation-reducing foods include fish and nuts.

Foods to minimize or avoid if you have arthritis include fried foods, processed foods, some dairy products, and high intakes of meat. Note dairy products that are high in calcium and low fat are help with osteoarthritis.

Some research also suggests that gluten antibodies may be present in people with RA. A gluten-free diet may improve symptoms and disease progression. A 2015 study also recommends a gluten-free diet for all people who receive a diagnosis of undifferentiated connective tissue disease.

Regular exercise will keep your joints flexible. Swimming is often a good form of exercise for people with arthritis because it doesn’t put pressure on your joints the way running and walking do. Staying active is important, but you should also be sure to rest when you need to and avoid overexerting yourself.

At-home exercises you can try include:

The head tilt, neck rotation, and other exercises to relieve pain in your neck.

Finger bends and thumb bends to ease pain in your hands.

Leg raises, hamstring stretches, and other easy exercises for knee arthritis.

We will look into all of these alternatives more in depth later on.
Right now I would like to concentrate of the medical aspects and allow you to make your own choices. I appreciate your patience. Thank you.

Many believe that arthritis disease is a medical condition experience only by the elderly. However, a persistent backache, neck strain, or other painful condition could very well be osteoarthritis, a common arthritis that afflicts individuals of any age. In fact, with every type of arthritis, the area surrounding joints including the elbow, knee and wrists can become swollen, red and tender to touch. In many incidences, there is a warm sensation around a joint with arthritis.

Spondylosis (a painful condition of the spine resulting from the degeneration of the intervertebral disks), is known to affect one out of every seven individuals of adult age. While it is most common in individuals 45 and older, it does affect younger individuals as well. It is often triggered by sports, accident’s or work related injury. Even though researchers and medical experts do not fully comprehend why, women usually experience spinal arthritis and more intensive severe chronic pain than do men.

What does arthritis feel like and how do you know you have it?

Gradually Worsening Pain

Osteoarthritis is a form of back pain that gradually worsens over time. Unlike a major backache that happens suddenly and excruciating in an attack, osteoarthritis begins with a twinge and becomes achier over time. Osteoarthritis feels more like an overall achiness or an acute pain in one or many areas of the back. Pain caused by osteoarthritis can also come and go, where you will feel normal and flexible for weeks or even months, before the pain returns worse than ever.

Limiting Range of Motion:

In addition to feeling stiff and achy, when rising every morning, you might also notice a stiff back or the inability to bend flexibly. Often times, osteoarthritis sufferers find it challenging to arch their back or bend over because it triggers intense severe pain. Many activities including dance, yoga or sports might become more challenging because of a limited range of motion and stiffness that only improves with exercise and stretching. Often times, the pain migrates in different areas, where the neck might be sore on the first day, the shoulder the next day, and the other shoulder sometime later.

Tingling and Numbness:

While many individuals believe they are suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome,(click on the blue text for more) it might actually be arthritis of the spine because of the similar symptoms. Arthritis often appears as a stiffness or sensation in the fingers, hands and wrists, causing the loss of control of fine motor movements. In addition, the condition can arise as numbness, tingling or twinge radiating from the shoulder down through the arm. As a result of nerve compression, it may be that the individual feels pain in a specific area, or down the entire arm. The sensation is also known to come and go.

When individuals wonder exactly what does arthritis feel like, it is important to note that every sufferer experiences something different. One individual may have weakness, numbness or pain in the legs, while others are presented with tingling and stiffness. Still, other individuals might be experiencing aches and pains that mimic other degenerative diseases or conditions.

Alternatives, Herbal:

Does Turmeric Help Relieve Arthritic Pain?

Turmeric Curcumin

I have to tell you I am a strong believer in the power of Turmeric, it should be mixed with black pepper for stronger benefits. Don’t worry we will be talking about how you can use turmeric. I will include certain tea, food and juice recipes, further on.
If you are looking for a way to get rid of arthritis without the use of a medicine, then turmeric is the alternative. Always keeping in mind your Doctors recommendations first.
Daily consumption of turmeric provides relief from mild joint pain and inflammation. Curcumin, (Curcumin is the key active ingredient in turmeric). Adding black pepper enhances the effects of turmeric. Often when bought, your turmeric should include curumin. Curcumin found in turmeric is one of the main factor’s which helps in treating osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. It also prevents degradation and loss of bone tissue. Studies have shown that turmeric is more effective in altering gene expression in order to prevent worsening and progression of the disease than reducing it.

How To Use Turmeric for Arthritis? 

Turmeric Capsules Or Turmeric Tablets for Arthritis?
Turmeric capsules are more effective than tablets.
Tablets are heated and a stabilizer is added to give them shape.
Heating reduces the potency of turmeric.
On the other hand, capsules are freeze-dried and thus remain fresh.
The recommended daily dose is 250 to 500 mg is three times a day

Topical Application:

Prepare a paste by mixing turmeric with coconut oil or extra virgin olive oil.
Gently massage the paste on the affected areas.
Use a gauze to cover the area and leave it for 30 minutes to one hour.
After removing the gauze, clean the area with cool water.
For effective and visible results, use this method couple of times during a day for a week or two.

Absorption of Turmeric by the Body:

In order to achieve the desired results, your body needs high dosage of curcumin. To do so, you can follow the below methods:

You would need 2 teaspoons of coconut oil, 1-2 egg yolks and 1 tablespoon turmeric powder.
Put them all in a blender and blend it thoroughly.

Another method that you can try out is to bowl 1 liter of water and add a tablespoon of curcumin powder in it.
Let the mixture boil for 10 minutes. Drink the mixture once it has cooled down a little. Remember that it should be consumed within 4 hours.

Turmeric for Arthritis

A Rheumatoid Arthritis Diet For Pain Relief:

Many people who are suffering from arthritis have found great benefits in following a rheumatoid arthritis diet. This diet is easy to follow and if followed consistently, may help to alleviate the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.

Gluten Free Foods:

Gluten Free Healthy Lifestyle Concept Processed foods with wheat, barley or rye in them may aggravate rheumatoid arthritis. Trying a gluten free diet can help to cleanse these toxins out of the system and may provide some relief to the condition. The patient may also need to eliminate breads, wheat cereals as well as some coffee creamers (yes, wheat in a coffee creamer) and the patient should learn to read labels consistently.

Avoid Processed Foods:

Many processed foods have a lot of chemicals in them. These chemicals can break down the body’s immune system and in turn bring on the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. Again, read labels and if foods are mostly additives, don’t buy them.

Weight:

Maintain a healthy weight. Studies show that being overweight can greatly aggravate the condition and may cause more symptoms.

Eat Less Protein:

Again, studies show that eating less protein may help relieve the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. When considering a rheumatoid arthritis diet one may consider lowering protein levels by eating smaller portions of protein and reducing the intake of such things as nuts, beans and meats. On a 2000 calorie diet for example, only 400 to 600 of those calories per day should be protein.

Drink Tea:

Green and white teas have high levels of phytochemicals and antioxidants in them. Raising these levels has been shown to reduce symptoms as well.

Drink Water: (Distilled would be the best)

Most people don’t drink enough water. Water helps to flush toxins out of the body and thus reduce symptoms.

Fats and Oils:

Lower saturated fats and increase healthy oils such as Omega 3s. Omega 3s have many health benefits and will help to maintain normal liver function as well as the rest of the body. Saturated fats will slow the metabolism down and clog the arteries.

Healthy Omega 3s are found in sardines, salmon, mackerel, trout, walnuts and flax seeds.

Eat More Green Vegetables:

Eating more green veggies will not only fill one up, it will also help to reduce arthritis symptoms. Great veggies to choose from include broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage, Bok Choy and Kale. Kale is also high in Vitamin K.

Vitamin D:  vitamin link

Many people are suffering from very low Vitamin D levels. Vitamin D helps the body to regulate waking and sleeping as well as protecting the body from viruses. It may be had by simply taking a walk in the sunshine but can also be included in the diet by eating more dairy and by taking a Vitamin D3 supplement.

Olive Oil:

Get rid of those other oils and move some virgin olive oil in to replace them. Olive oil used in cooking, on salads and ingested will help to ease those joints and reduce inflammation as well as pain.

Best Fruits To Battle Arthritis:

Tart cherries.

Tart cherries get their rich red color and many of their powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant benefits from the flavonoid anthocyanin. These properties make tart cherries a popular research subject, and some investigators compare the effects to non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

Studies, which often use the concentrated juice of Montmorency cherries, have found tart cherries may relieve joint pain in people with osteoarthritis and lower the risk of flares in those with gout. Recent studies suggest tart cherries may improve the quality and duration of sleep.

Strawberries.

Strawberries are naturally low in sugar and have more vitamin C per serving than an orange. Vitamin C can lower risk for gout, high blood pressure and cholesterol problems. Research has also shown that women who ate 16 or more strawberries a week had lower C-reactive protein (CRP), a measure of body-wide inflammation linked to arthritis flares and heart disease.

As with cherries, scientists suspect it’s anthocyanin, along with other phytochemicals, that gives strawberries their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant health benefits. These berries are also a good source of folic acid, which the arthritis medication methotrexate can deplete. People taking the drug often need folic acid supplements to help prevent side effects. You may still need a capsule supplement, but strawberries help increase your intake while providing other benefits.

Red Raspberries.

Like strawberries, these berries are among the highest in vitamin C and anthocyanin. Animal studies have shown extracts from the fruit reduce inflammation and osteoarthritis symptoms. Other research shows the fruit’s bioactive compounds lower system-wide inflammation and, when a regular part of the diet, help prevent a number of chronic conditions, such as heart disease, stroke and type-2 diabetes.

Avocado.

The rich, creamy texture of this fruit comes in part from its high content of anti-inflammatory monounsaturated fat. Avocados are also rich in the carotenoid lutein. Unlike most fruits, avocados are a good source of vitamin E, a micro nutrient with anti-inflammatory effects. Diets high in these compounds are linked to decreased risk of the joint damage seen in early osteoarthritis.

Studies also show eating avocados daily increases “good” HDL cholesterol and lowers its “bad” LDL counterpart. Despite the fruit’s relatively high calorie content, research has found that regular avocado eaters tend to weigh less and have smaller waists. Their high fiber and fat content may help people control cravings.

Watermelon.

Watermelon is another fruit with anti-inflammatory action; studies show it reduces CRP. It’s high in the carotenoid beta-cryptoxanthin, which can reduce the risk of rheumatoid arthritis, according to studies that followed people’s dietary habits over time. It leads the fruit pack in lycopene, an antioxidant that may help protect against certain cancers and lower heart attack risk.
Once cup has about 40% more lycopene than raw tomatoes, the next richest raw food source. Watermelon is also ninety-two percent water, which makes it great for hydration and weight management. One cup of watermelon has about 40 calories – plus about a third of your recommended daily allowance of vitamins A and C.

Grapes.

“Grapes, both white and darker-colored varieties, are a great source of beneficial antioxidants and other polyphenols. “Fresh red and black grapes also contain resveratrol, the heart-healthy compound found in red wine that contributes to cardiovascular health by improving the function of blood vessels.”

Best Foods To Battle Arthritis. Please click for more.

Although there is no diet cure for arthritis, certain foods have been shown to fight inflammation, strengthen bones and boost the immune system. Adding these foods to your balanced diet may help ease the symptoms of your arthritis.

Fish

Because certain types of fish are packed with inflammation-fighting omega-3 fatty acids, experts recommend at least 3 to 4 ounces of fish, twice a week. Omega-3-rich fish include salmon, tuna, mackerel and herring.
Great for: rheumatoid arthritis

Soy

Not a fan of fish but still want the inflammation-busting benefits of omega-3 fatty acids? Try heart-healthy soybeans (tofu or edamame). Soybeans are also low in fat, high in protein and fiber and an all-around good-for-you food.
Great for: rheumatoid arthritis

Oils

Extra virgin olive oil is loaded with heart-healthy fats, as well as oleocanthal, which has properties similar to non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory drugs. But it’s not the only oil with health benefits. Avocado and safflower oils have shown cholesterol-lowering properties, while walnut oil has 10 times the omega-3s that olive oil has.
Great for: rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis

Cherries

Studies have shown cherries help reduce the frequency of gout attacks. Research has shown that the anthocyanins found in cherries have an anti-inflammatory effect. Anthocyanins can also be found in other red and purple fruits like strawberries, raspberries, blueberries and blackberries.

Great for: Gout

Broccoli

Rich in vitamins K and C, broccoli also contains a compound called sulforaphane, which researchers have found could help prevent or slow the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). Broccoli is also rich in calcium, which is known for its bone-building benefits.
Great for: osteoarthritis

Green Tea

Green tea is packed with polyphenols, antioxidants believed to reduce inflammation and slow cartilage destruction. Studies also show that another antioxidant in green tea called epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) blocks the production of molecules that cause joint damage in people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
Great for: osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis

Citrus Fruits

Citrus fruits – like oranges, grapefruits and limes – are rich in vitamin C. Research shows that getting the right amount of vitamin aids in preventing inflammatory arthritis and maintaining healthy joints with osteoarthritis (OA).
Great for: rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis

Grain

Whole grains lower levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the blood. CRP is a marker of inflammation associated with heart disease, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis. Foods like oatmeal, brown rice and whole-grain cereals are excellent sources of whole grains.
Great for: rheumatoid arthritis

Beans

Beans are packed with fiber, a nutrient that helps lower CRP. Beans are also an excellent – and inexpensive – source of protein, which is important for muscle health. Some beans are rich in folic acid, magnesium, iron, zinc and potassium, all known for their heart and immune system benefits. Look for red beans, kidney beans and pinto beans.
Great for: rheumatoid arthritis

Garlic

Studies have shown that people who regularly ate foods from the allium family – such as garlic, onions and leeks – showed fewer signs of early osteoarthritis (OA). Researchers believe the compound diallyl disulphine found in garlic may limit cartilage-damaging enzymes in human cells.
Great for: osteoarthritis

Nuts

Nuts are rich in protein, calcium, magnesium, zinc, vitamin E and immune-boosting alpha linolenic acid (ALA), as well as filling protein and fiber. They are heart-healthy and beneficial for weight loss. Try walnuts, pine nuts, pistachios and almonds.
Great for: osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis

Other Considerations:

Herbal Remedies please click for more:

Proponents of cinnamon in alleviating symptoms of RA contribute its healing powers to the anti-inflammatory qualities of cinnamon bark. In addition, cinnamon is noted to help with aches and pains, especially when they are worse with cold or cold weather.
The Problem? Cinnamon in large doses can be detrimental to your health. In addition, cinnamon has been found to have potential harmful effects to pregnant women and may negatively react with your body’s natural blood clotting as well as interacts with any blood thinning medications you are taking.

Willow Bark:

Willow bark, as the name quite literally says, is the bark off of willow trees. This bark has been found to have anti-inflammatory properties which assist with pain relief. In fact, it has very similar qualities to everyday aspirin.

The Problem? The active ingredient in willow bark, a chemical called salicin, can be fatal in large doses, as it shuts down the kidneys. Fun fact of the day: salicin overdose is what killed Beethoven.

Black Pepper:

It’s making me sneeze just thinking about it. Black pepper has long been known to aid in pain relief and swelling reduction. You may have heard of capsaicin? Well, that’s the key ingredient in black pepper that’s thought to give RA relief. Capsaicin appears in many over the counter creams and lotions – most often associated with anti-inflammatory medications.

The Problem? As is typical of most creams and lotions, the relief is only temporary and needs to be used frequently to maintain pain relief.

Ginger:

Has been known to be helpful for a lot of things, especially nausea. What’s the one thing your mom whipped out every time you were feeling sick to your stomach when you were little? Ginger ale. Go figure. It’s also been shown to help alleviate morning sickness in pregnant women, and it’s noted to have anti-inflammatory qualities to alleviate arthritis symptoms. Elements in ginger have been found to reduce the action of T cells, which are those cells which are going around attacking your healthy cells. The overall result is a decrease in systemic inflammation.

The Problem?

The dose needed to benefit from decreased systemic inflammation is unclear.

Arthritis 1

Natural Pain Remedies Arthritis

Aches & Pains – Osteoarthritis (Arthritis or Joint Pain) – Natural Ayurvedic Home Remedies video

 

 

 

Thank you for visiting.

Comments and Suggestions are Welcome.

Michael

Type 2 Diabetes – The Root Causes

Type 2 Diabetes – The Root Causes

                 Diabetes Type 2

Root causes of diabetes 2- Inflammation

There are several reasons I wanted to publish an article on Type 2 Diabetes. I once had a friend who was suffering from this disease, he was the kind of guy who loved beer, really did not maintain a proper diet and had to be rushed to Hospital on several occasions.

The other reason was I was just looking at the statistics of people suffering from this disease, and they are staggering.

New Cases of Diabetes in Adults and Children. In 2015, an estimated 1.5 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed among U.S. adults aged 18 years or older. This includes approximately 193,000 children and adolescents younger than age 20 years.

I was unable to find any data on the cases of diabetes in more recent years, but I am sure they have risen. That is sad.

The Root Cause of Diabetes:

blood sugar test on finger pictureIt may be hard to believe, but when you prick your finger with a meter and see a blood sugar reading of let’s say 250, it’s NOT because you have diabetes! Some people can walk around with blood sugar as high as 300 without having diabetes. How is this possible? It all comes down to a single word: INFLAMMATION.

On an Empty Stomach: The Normal range for a person without diabetes is: 70–99 mg/dl (3.9–5.5 mmol/L)

For someone with diabetes: 80–130 mg/dl (4.4–7.2 mmol/L)

Two hours after meals the Normal range for a person without diabetes: Less than 140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/L)

For someone with diabetes: Less than 180 mg/dl (10.0 mmol/L)

Do diabetics have higher rates of heart disease, heart attacks, cancer, high cholesterol, blindness, arthritis, and neuropathy? Inflammation.

Just recently; February 2015, Scientists and researchers at the University of California San Diego proved that type 2 diabetes is caused by inflammation: they discovered that an inflammatory molecule called LTB4 causes insulin resistance. And what does insulin resistance lead to? high blood sugar and diabetes.

woman injecting herself with insulinThis is the reason why treating your blood sugar with drugs and injecting insulin to combat insulin sensitivity will never heal your diabetes; because you aren’t treating the root cause of diabetes, just the symptoms of it.

If we treat the symptoms of a condition, rather than the causes of the condition, we can be stuck treating them forever. Wouldn’t it be wiser to treat the causes of diabetes rather than the symptoms? The groundbreaking information you will receive targets the causes of diabetes, which is why people see results so quickly, get off their medication and end the need for insulin.

Or another example. Let’s say you broke your leg. What are the symptoms? Bleeding and lots of pain. If you take painkillers and wrap your leg in a bandage to stop the bleeding, have you fixed your broken leg? No, you simply treated the symptoms. You still have a problem – the broken leg.

So how does this compare to diabetes? Exactly the same. What are the symptoms of diabetes? High blood sugar and insulin resistance. What do doctors prescribe? Pills to lower blood sugar and insulin to help with insulin resistance. Have you actually done anything to treat diabetes itself? No. You have simply treated the SYMPTOMS of it. So again, you are still sick, you still have a problem, but now you feel a little better.

When you get sick, your body shows symptoms. Shouldn’t you treat the underlying disease and not the symptoms?

Imagine a car. Something is wrong in the engine. A red warning light turns on – a symptom of a faulty engine. What would you do? Treat the red warning light or the actual engine? Being an automotive technician, I have seen many people put black tape to cover that engine light.

Modern medical and pharmaceutical companies treat the red warning light. With type 2 diabetes it is inflammation, which causes resistance to insulin and therefore raising your blood sugar levels. What happens if we treat the cause of the inflammation?

Diabetes Drugs Are Extremely Dangerous: Not only are diabetes drugs ineffective at attacking the root cause of your diabetes, but they are also extremely dangerous too. Over 100,000 people die every single year from drugs properly prescribed by their doctor. Not only could your diabetes kill you, but the drugs you are taking could take you down any day too.

Diabetes drugs artificially adjust your blood sugar, they don’t do anything to address the root cause of your disease. They are only made to ‘treat’ and ‘manage’. So you still live with the constant daily threat of heart attacks, stroke, kidney failure, limb amputations, dementia, hypertension, nerve system disease, high cholesterol, depression, coma, and blindness.

Please by NO means refuse your Doctor’s advice.

The following are findings by Scientists and Researches. Once again please be cautious, for what I am going to tell you are the natural sources provided by, “Mother Nature”.

1. Fig Leaves

fig leaves treat diabetesFig leaves are best known for treating diabetes, but there are many other uses for the fig leaves. There are many homemade remedies from treating diabetes to treating bronchitis, genital warts, liver cirrhosis, high blood pressure, skin problems, and ulcers. Fig leaves are not used as much as they should be. Most of the remedies for the fig leaves use the sap or the milk of the sacred tree. Fig tinctures or poultices should be used immediately and fresh batches made daily.

The big news with the use of fig leaves is that they have anti-diabetic properties. A diabetic needs less insulin when on the treatment of using the fig leaf extract. The diabetic should take the extract with breakfast, first thing in the morning. An additional remedy is to boil the leaves of the fig in some freshly filtered water and drink this as a tea. Read the whole article on fig leaves and diabetes:

Please Highlight URL’s With Your Cursor And Click On Search

https://www.naturalnews.com/027050_figs_healt…

2. Black Seed

Nigella Sativa treats diabetesBlack seed, also known as Nigella Sativa is a cure for all diseases, except death and considered to be a miraculous cure. It has been used for everything from acne to pancreatic cancers and doctors are raving about the results. Read about this remedy that has been used for over 2000 years.

https://www.naturalnews.com/026868_Nigella_Sa…

For seven days take 6 teaspoons of the oil. Take the oil three different times of the day. Then take 2 teaspoons in the morning and 2 in the evening for 4 days. Follow by taking 2 teaspoons of the oil for two days. Take plenty of water in the morning and rub the oil all over the body for 10 days. You must mix the oil with fruit juice. Repeat this treatment if you do not see any improvement.

Another remedy for the treatment of diabetes is to take one-half cup of the seeds that have been heated and a half cup of watercress seeds (mustard seeds can be substituted) and a 1/4 cup of ground pomegranate peel. Place these all in a blender and pulse well to a fine powder. Add in 1/8 cup of fumitory, ( Fumitory is a low shrub with gray pointed leaves, and from a distance, the plant can have the wispy appearance of smoke. Because of this, it received the name “earth smoke.” The parts of the plant that grow above the ground are used to make medicine.) Each day take one teaspoon of the ground powder and one teaspoon of the oil, one hour before you eat. Do this for at least one month.

3. Fenugreek

Fenugreek to treat diabetesTake 5-30 grams with each meal or up to 90 grams once a day. Do not take more than 100 grams as it will cause an upset stomach and make a person nauseated. Fenugreek cannot be taken at the same time as other medicines. You must wait at least one hour and preferably two before taking fenugreek. Diarrhea and gas are common side effects of fenugreek.

Warnings about taking fenugreek: If you notice these side effects stop taking fenugreek right away: difficulty in breathing, tightness in chest, rash, swollen and itchy skin. Also, if you are pregnant, consult your physician before taking fenugreek.

4. Cinnamon

Cinnamon to treat diabetesCinnamon has long been reported as a good source for the treatment of diabetes, due to a study done in 2003 by Khan and associates. 60 people were tested in the group and one-third of the group was given a placebo. The end results were very impressive and the overall health of the group was increased with glucose down 18 percent; LDL cholesterol and triglycerides also showed reduced levels. Everyone was excited and the word of using cinnamon spread.

According to Cancer Tutor.com, “At least 1/2 teaspoon a day, which is critical to “soften” the cell membranes. Cinnamon mimics insulin, thus it may lower your need for insulin immediately.”

5. Grapeseed Extract

Grapeseed extract to treat diabetesGrape Seed extract has been proven to improve the conditions associated with this disease. Grape seed performed greatly in studies conducted in 2006 in Toyama Japan, in 2009 in Romania and also in Portsmouth UK. Grapeseed was successful in protecting the liver cells and setting up defense mechanisms against reactive oxygen species produced by hyperglycemic conditions.

Grape seed comes in capsules of 50-100mg. It is usually suggested taking 50mg per 50 lbs of weight, not to exceed 300 mg per day. Whole grape seeds are the best alternative, which needs to be ground and placed in vegetarian capsules. Taking 3 capsules a day is enough. The time of day does not matter.

6. Olive Oil

olive oil used to treat diabetesThe Department of Health Sciences of the University of Jaen is researching the correlation between preventing diabetes, and the consumption of olive oil. Through research, they have found that an oil-rich diet may prevent diabetes. By using olive oil, you can reduce your blood levels including LDL and triglycerides.

By olive oil reducing the cholesterol levels, you can prevent such diseases as cardiovascular, atherosclerosis and diabetes. Prevention of diabetes begins with weight management and proper diet. The Mediterranean diet has been shown beneficial in the treatment of diabetes by using olive oil, which is monounsaturated instead of saturated fats.

Before sleeping drink 1/4 cup of olive oil. If you prefer to use lecithin, mix one tablespoon of lecithin with one tablespoon of olive oil. Keep in mind that one cup of olive oil has 2000 calories. Just because it is healthy does not mean a person can ignore the calorie intake.

To learn how olive oil cures over 60 diseases, read this article:

7. Bitter Melon

bitter melon used to treat diabetesResearchers have proven that bitter melon works great with the treatment of diabetes. It contains insulin-like properties which help in the lowering of the blood and urine levels. It is suggested to be used frequently.

The bitter melon should be juiced and then taken on an empty stomach before eating first thing in the morning. The seeds may be ground to a powder and eaten as well. You can also, make a tea from the bitter melon.

8. Vitamin C and Diabetes

Researchers have found that using from 100-600 mg of vitamin C daily can cause you to normalize your sugar levels, in as little as one month. Diabetics have a complication of too much sugar, sorbitol, in the body, which eventually leads to eye and nerve damage.                        

                              Home Made Remedies

It should be noted that there are no case studies about these home remedies, only people testifying to their personal success.

1. Avocado

Take one avocado seed and grill the seed. Slice the seed into several chunks. Add this to a pot of water and bring to boil, wait till the water turns brown. Strain the water mixture and drink when cool. Expect to see results within two weeks.

2. Apples

Take one apple and cut into chunks. Place the apple in a pan with 4 cups of water and bring to boil and cook until the water is reduced in half. Drink this morning and night. It is expected to show relief within two months.

Diabetes does not have to be a life-threatening disease. It is possible and probable with natural remedies to allow the patient to live a normal and healthy life.

Resources:

Cunningham JJ et al. Vitamin C: an aldose reductase inhibitor that normalizes erythrocyte sorbitol in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. J Am Coll Nutr. 1994 Aug. 13; 4: 344-5.

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Diabetes is a life-long disease that affects the way your body handles glucose, a kind of sugar, in your blood.

Most people with the condition have type 2. There are about 27 million people in the U.S. with it. Another 86 million have prediabetes: Their blood glucose is not normal, but not high enough to be diabetes yet.

                                 What Causes Diabetes?

Your pancreas makes a hormone called insulin. It’s what lets your cells turn glucose from the food you eat into energy. People with type 2 diabetes make insulin, but their cells don’t use it as well as they should. Doctors call this insulin resistance.

At first, the pancreas makes more insulin to try to get glucose into the cells. But eventually it can’t keep up, and the sugar builds up in your blood instead.

Usually, a combination of things causes type 2 diabetes, including:

Genes. Scientists have found different bits of DNA that affect how your body makes insulin.

Extra weight. Being overweight or obese can cause insulin resistance, especially if you carry your extra pounds around the middle. Now type 2 diabetes affects kids and teens as well as adults, mainly because of childhood obesity.

No doubt: Water is the perfect drink. It doesn’t have calories, sugar, or carbs, and it’s as close as a tap. If you’re after something tastier, though, you’ve got options.

Fluids:

1. Chocolate Milk

This treat may remind you of the school lunchroom, but it’s a good calcium-rich choice for grown-ups as well. Low-fat chocolate milk can be a good post-workout recovery drink. The bad news: Ready-made brands come packed with sugar. Try this at home: Mix 1% milk, 3 teaspoons of cocoa powder, and 2 tablespoons of the zero-calorie sweetener of your choice. It saves you 70 calories, 16 grams of carbs, and 2 grams of fat compared to 1 cup of store-bought, reduced-fat chocolate milk.

2. Sweet Tea:

A 16-ounce fast-food version might have up to 36 grams of carbs. That’s a lot of sugar, especially when there are carb-free choices, like sugar-free iced tea or iced tea crystals, that are just as satisfying. But you can also easily make your own: Steep tea with your favorite crushed fruit (raspberries are a good choice). Strain, chill and then sweeten with your choice of no-calorie sugar substitute. That’s a tall glass of refreshment.

3. Orange Juice:

OJ tastes good, but with 26 grams of carbs in one cup, you’re a lot better off eating a whole orange instead. The fiber will help keep you full. If you really want to drink it, try an orange-flavored light fruit drink. Look for a brand with 3 grams of carbs, 15 calories, and 100% of your daily vitamin C.

4. Chai Latte:

It’s sweet, spicy, fragrant, and creamy. What’s not to love? The typical coffeehouse version packs a whopping 33 grams of carbs. But you can easily make one that’s a lot lighter. Steep one or two chai tea bags in a cup of unsweetened almond milk, and spice it up with cinnamon and black pepper for an extra flavor kick. That’s a warm treat with less than 1 gram of carbs.

5. Lemonade:

Nothing says summer like this drink. But 16 ounces of a popular brand served at restaurants gives you 60 grams of carbs. Your best bet is to make lemonade at home. Mix water, fresh-squeezed lemons, zero-calorie sweetener, and ice for a truly refreshing beverage without a single carb or calorie in sight.

6. Hot Chocolate:

It’s the ultimate in decadent drinks. Coffeehouse-style versions of this classic are packed with carbs. A typical medium hot chocolate made with low-fat milk has 60 grams. Good news: You can make your own satisfying mug for less than half that. Mix 1 cup of low-fat milk with 2 squares of 70% dark chocolate, 1 teaspoon of vanilla, and a little cinnamon. Melt in a saucepan, and enjoy it for only 23 grams of carbs.

7. Apple Cider:

Few things beat a hot, fragrant cup of this when there’s a chill in the air and the leaves are turning colors. And though it may be farm-fresh, the cider packs the same amount of carbs per serving as plain-old apple juice — 26 grams per cup. Instead, choose a light apple juice cocktail, and you’ll cut the carbs and calories in half.

8. Energy Drinks:

These pack plenty of caffeine per ounce, so depending on how much you drink, you could be guzzling way more than you realize. That’s a problem since caffeine can raise your blood pressure and heart rate. Still, want a jolt? Pick a sugar-free drink, and limit your total caffeine to no more than 400 milligrams over the course of a day.

9. Fruit Smoothie:

It seems like a healthy choice, but store-bought versions almost always include a lot of carbs and sugar. One 12-ounce mango-flavored smoothie from a popular chain, for example, has 58.5 grams of carbs. That’s equal to an apple and a sandwich combined. Substitute a homemade berry smoothie, with half a cup each of blueberries, strawberries, and banana. Blend with some ice and enjoy for about half the amount of carbs.

10. Ginger Ale:

A 20-ounce bottle can have 60 grams of carbs. You can have more of the zesty flavor with none of the sugar or carbs by adding a spoonful of finely grated ginger to a glass of seltzer water. Add a bit of your favorite zero-calorie sugar substitute, and enjoy.

11. Café Mocha:

Chocolate and coffee are a great pairing. The bittersweet flavor combo makes it a popular coffeehouse drink. But some have more than 300 calories and 40 grams of carbs, so it’s not your best choice. Instead, make your mocha by mixing 1 cup of brewed coffee with 1 tablespoon of cocoa powder, 2 tablespoons of low-fat milk, and a little of your favorite zero-calorie sugar substitute. You’ll save more than 300 calories, 40 grams of carbs, and 14 grams of fat.

Conclusion:

There comes a time when I have to take into consideration, and like myself, if all these medications that have been prescribed to me by a Doctor are actually working. I take medication for depression and an anxiety disorder. I have been on several combinations for over twenty years. It is only recently that I have decided to research these medications. The side effects are so out of this world, it is pretty darn scary. My anti-depression medication may cause suicidal thoughts, well that’s not so good. My anxiety medications may cause, yes, unfortunately, loss of sex drive, it could cause depression, blood disorders, enlarged liver and so much more.

There is a slight problem if you decide to stop taking these medications. Seizure’s, trembling, heart attack. Oh my gosh, “Houston, I have a problem”. I have to taper these drugs down. Wean myself off them.

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms and Causes- The Mayo Clinic. Link.

Please ask your Pharmacist, go on the Internet and find out what it is you are taking. I also ask you to please see a Doctor first and then decide on your plan of action. Thank you and take care of yourselves

Live long and prosper,

Comments are welcome

Michael